People

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Kosuke Imai 
Professor
Corwin Hall 036 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-6601
email
(Website)

Kosuke Imai is a professor in the Department of Politics and an executive committee member of the Committee for Statistical Studies.  He also serves as the director of the newly created undergraduate certificate in statistics and machine learning.  Imai specializes in the development of statistical methods and their applications to social science research.  He has published more than thirty peer-refereed journal articles in political science, statistics, economics, and psychology.

 

Adam Meirowitz
John Work Garrett Professor of Politics
Corwin Hall 040 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, New Jersey 08544
p: 609-258-4859
email
(Website)

Adam Meirowitz teaches in the formal theory sequence.  He is primarily interested in game theory with applications to the study of information and preference aggregation.  Research topics include deliberation, electoral accountability, protests, bargaining and militarization.  He has published in the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, The American Political Science Review,  The American Journal of Political Science, The Journal of Politics, The Journal of Economic Theory, Games and Economic Behavior and Social Choice and Welfare among others.

 

Kristopher Ramsay
Associate Professor
Corwin Hall 038 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-2960
email
(Website)

Kristopher Ramsay teaches in the subfields of international relations and formal theory and quantitative methods.  He is a theorist whose research focuses on the strategy of conflict, causes of war, and the role of institutions in shaping peace.  He has published articles in International Organization, American Journal of Political Science, American Political Science Review, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, and World Politics, among others. 

 

FACULTY

Brandice Canes-Wrone
Donald E. Stokes Professor in Public and International Affairs, 
Professor of Politics and Public Affairs. Acting Vice Dean, Woodrow Wilson School.      
Corwin Hall 034 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-9047
email
(Website)

Brandice Canes-Wrone has written extensively on issues related to American politics, political economy, elections, and the courts. She is currently working on projects concerning the economic effects of electoral institutions, how the selection procedures for judges affect their decisions on the court, the impact of presidential campaigning on congressional elections, and presidential policy making. Canes-Wrone has taught classes on Business, Government, and Public Policy; The Presidency; The Politics of Public Policy; Housing Policy; and American Political Institutions. She is a Principal Investigator of the NSF-funded Empirical Implications of Theoretical Methods and serves on the boards of the American National Election Studies, American Journal of Political Science, Public Choice, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and Congress and the Presidency.

 

David B. Carter
Assistant Professor
Corwin Hall 033 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-6832
email
(Website)

David Carter's research is in the field of international relations, with a focus on conflict. His research explores the role violent non-state actors such as terrorist and insurgent groups play in international relations, the role of territory in violent conflict, and the use foreign aid as a policy tool, among other topics. He has published in American Journal of Political Science, International Organization, Journal of Politics, British Journal of Political Science, Political Analysis, Journal of Conflict Resolution and PS: Political Science and Politics. Current projects explore: how violent non-state actors strategically choose tactics in anticipation of government response, how targets of transnational terrorist and insurgent groups apply pressure on host states, the ways in which new international boundaries affect conflict and cooperation between neighboring states, and how domestic political institutions, democratic or authoritarian, influence the incentives of marginalized groups to employ violence.

 

Matias Iaryczower
Assistant Professor
Corwin Hall 037 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-1018
email
(Website)

Matias Iaryczower teaches in the formal theory sequence. His work uses Game Theory and Quantitative Methods to explore how different institutions affect collective decision-making in legislatures, courts and elections. His current research topics include the interaction between ideology and information in Congress and the Court, the effect of strategic deliberation in the Court, the role of intermediaries in legislative bargaining, and the consequences of political marketing in elections. He has published in the American Economic Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Law, Economics & Organization, the Journal of Politics, and the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, among others. 

 

John Kastellec
Assistant Professor
Corwin Hall 039 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-8951
email
(Website)

Jonathan Kastellec studies American politics, with a focus on judicial politics. His work uses both game theory and statistics to understand judicial behavior. His current research projects include studying the intersection of collegiality and hierarchy on the U.S. Courts of Appeals, the mechanisms of judicial influence (with a particular focus on the relationship between race and judging), and studying the effects of partisan bias on public opinion about the Supreme Court. His research has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, the Journal of Law, Economics, & Organization, and Political Research Quarterly.

 

John B. Londregan
Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School
Bendheim Hall 217 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-4854
email
(Website)

John Londregan is a specialist in the development and applicaton of statistical methods in political science. He has also done extensive analysis of Chilean legislative and electoral politics since the transition from the Pinochet dictatorship to democracy. Londregan is the author of Legislative institutions and Ideology in Chile, as well as a contributor to numerous journals and edited volumes. Professor Londregan is a past winner of the Miller Prize for Best Paper in Political Analysis.

 

Nolan McCarty
Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs
Department Chair
Corwin Hall 135 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-2160
email
(Website)

Nolan McCarty's areas of interest include U.S. politics, democratic political institutions, and political methodology. He is the author of numerous books and scholarly articles and is a co-founder of the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, a journal that focuses on innovative research in analytical political science. McCarty is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

Marc Ratkovic
Assistant Professor
Corwin Hall 035 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-1030
email
(Website)

His research focuses on political methodology, including the development of new machine learning methods as well as their introduction to a political science audience. His dissertation developed several methods for variable selection and fitting high-dimensional models with applications to political science. Working under Kosuke Imai , he has developed several projects that combine machine learning, smoothers, variable selection, and causal inference, with an eye to questions of interest to political and other social scientists.

 

Thomas Romer
Professor of Politics and Public Affairs; Director, Research Program in Political Economy
Robertson Hall 306 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-1857
email
(Website)

Thomas Romer's research explores the interaction of the market and nonmarket forces that influence the allocation of economic resources. He taught at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Western Ontario, and has been a visiting scholar at the Federal Trade Commission, Stanford University, University of Sydney, New York University, University of Cape Town, Institute for Advanced Study, Russell Sage Foundation, and a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. His work on the politics and economics of local governments’ taxation and spending behavior was awarded the Duncan Black Prize of the Public Choice Society. Other work has dealt with land use regulation, campaign finance, the savings and loan debacle of the 1980s, and the political economy of redistribution. His current projects focus on the political economy of federalism and the financing of public education. He has served on the advisory panels of the National Science Foundation and on the editorial boards of the American Economic Review and Public Choice. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  Ph.D. Yale University.

 

Jacob N. Shapiro
Assistant Professor
Corwin Hall 032 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-2256
email
(Website)

Jacob Shapiro teaches in the subfields of international relations and security. His research focuses on how to build durable peace and encourage economic development in conflict zones. He uses a combination of applied theory and program evaluation. He has published in Journal of Political Economy, American Journal of Political Science, International Security, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, Political Analysis, and World Politics, among others.

 

Leonard Wantchekon
Professor of Politics
Corwin Hall 230 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-6723
email
(Website)

Leonard Wantchekon is Professor in the Politics department and associated faculty in the Economics department. His research is broadly focused on Political and Economic development, particularly in Africa and his specific interests include topics such as democratization, clientelism and redistributive politics, resource curse, and long-term social impact of historical events. He is a member of the Executive Committee of the Council for International Teaching and Research at Princeton. He served as the Secretary of the American Political Science Association (2008-2009) and is a member of the Executive Committee of the Afrobarometer Network, as well as the Ibrahim Index Technical Committee of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, which supports good governance and great leadership in Africa. He is also the founder the Africa School of Economics (ASE) set to open in Benin in 2014.

 

RESEARCH SPECIALISTS

Jonathan Olmsted
Senior Research Specialist
Corwin Hall 029 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-6202 
email
(Website)

Jonathan Olmsted is a Senior Research Specialist in the Department of Politics. His background is in social science and scientific computing. He joined the department in the Winter of 2013 and is still finishing his PhD in Political Science at the University of Rochester. On the political science side of things, his work focused on structural models, Bayesian inference, and measurement. On the computing side, he is interested in bringing the many faces of high-performance computing to social science researchers.

 

PREDOCTORAL FELLOWS 

Steven Liao 
Predoctoral Fellow
Corwin Hall 130 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
email
(Website)

Steven Liao is a Predoctoral Fellow in the Politics Department at Princeton University and a Ph.D. Candidate in the Politics Department at the University of Virginia. His research interests lie at the intersection of International Political Economy and Quantitative Methods, with a specific focus on migration. His dissertation examines how states shape international human mobility using statistical methods for causal inference. Outside of the dissertation, he has a multi-paper project that examines the determinants of Chinese RMB internationalization.

 

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS

Michael Higgins
Postdoctoral Fellow
Corwin Hall 028 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
p: 609-258-9867
email
(Website)

Michael Higgins received his PhD in Statistics from the University of California at Berkeley in Spring 2013. He is interested in the development of statistical methods and theory motivated by problems in Political Science. Broad statistical interests include nonparametric statistics, causal inference, and experimental design. His work has been applied to problems in election auditing and statistical matching. He is especially interested in the use of integer programming methods to solve statistical problems.

 

Kentaro Hirose
Postdoctoral Fellow
Corwin Hall 130 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
email
(Website)

Kentaro Hirose is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Formal and Quantitative Methods in the Department of Politics at Princeton University. His dissertation develops game theoretical models to analyze military threats and applies Bayesian hidden Markov switching models to explain unobservable threats to use force.

 

James Lo
Postdoctoral Fellow
Corwin Hall 130 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
email

James Lo received his PhD in Political Science from the University of California at Los Angeles. Before coming to Princeton, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Mannheim in Germany. His research interests lie in the field of American politics, and previous work has focused on campaign effects, redistricting, and legislative politics.

 

GRADUATE STUDENT FELLOWS

Benjamin Fifield 
Graduate Student Fellow
Corwin Hall 026 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
email

Ben Fifield is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Politics at Princeton University, where he studies American political institutions and quantitative methods. His research interests include: lobbying and firm influence in American regulatory politics, how federal agencies develop and maintain workforce capacity, and redistricting in congressional elections. He has twice co-taught the Politics Department "boot camp" in the R statisticial programming language and has served as a preceptor for Quantitative Analysis II (graduate).

 

Gabriel Lopez-Moctezuma
Graduate Student Fellow
Corwin Hall 031 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
email

Gabriel López-Moctezuma is a Ph.D. candidate in Princeton’s Politics Department in the fields of Political Economy and Formal and Quantitative Methods. His research analyzes deliberative decision making with a focus on monetary policy committees and electoral politics. Before joining Princeton, López-Moctezuma worked as an economist in the Research Division of the Mexican Central Bank. López-Moctezuma earned a B.A. degree in Economics and a B.A. degree in Political Science from ITAM (Mexico).

 

Saurabh Pant
Graduate Student Fellow
Corwin Hall 026 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
email

Saurabh Pant is a PhD candidate in Princeton's Politics department in the fields of international relations and political economy. His research interests include the political economy of religion, and armed conflict. His current research examines the impact of religious practices, institutions, and doctrine on political outcomes. Saurabh received his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Economics (Policy) from New York University, and received his MPA in Public and Economic Policy from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

 

Yuki Shiraito
Graduate Student Fellow
Corwin Hall 031 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
email 

Yuki is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Politics with research interests in political economy, quantitative methodology, and armed conflict.   His current work examines the effect of misperception of diplomatic signals in international crises.   He is also interested in the political economy of violent conflict, causal inference, and Bayesian statistical methods.   Before joining the Princeton political economy program in 2010, he received his undergraduate and Master's degree in law and politics from the University of Tokyo in 2007 and 2009, respectively.

 

Carlos Velasco Rivera
Graduate Student Fellow
Corwin Hall 031 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
email
(Website)

Carlos Velasco Rivera is a PhD candidate in Politics.  His research interests include: the electoral effects of public policies, the reproduction and survival of elites, structural estimation, and causal inference.  While at Princeton he has taught an introductory course in quantitative analysis at the Woodrow Wilson School’s Junior Summer Institute, and served as a preceptor for Quantitative Analysis and Politics (undergraduate) and Quantitative Analysis II (graduate).

 

Bella Wang
Graduate Student Fellow
Corwin Hall 026 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
email

Bella Wang is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Politics at Princeton University, in the areas of international relations, security studies, and formal and quantitative methods. She primarily studies elite decision-making in territorial disputes, particularly in East Asia, and develops game theoretic models to investigate the role of policy experimentation and adjustment in these disputes and in foreign policy in general. Other ongoing research projects include China's adaptation to WTO norms and rules through the Dispute Settlement Body and the effect of international socialization on states' approaches to adjudication and dispute settlement.

 

Yang-Yang Zhou
Graduate Student Fellow
Corwin Hall 026 | Department of Politics | Princeton University | Princeton, NJ 08544
email
(Website)

Yang-Yang Zhou is a PhD candidate in the Department of Politics at Princeton University and a National Science Foundation graduate research fellow. She studies the consequences of violence and repression on political activism and interpersonal trust with a regional focus on Sub-Saharan Africa. Other research interests include citizenship, migration, refugee issues, global health, and survey methodology. She has conducted fieldwork in Ghana, Benin, Senegal, Tanzania, and Bahrain. She also works for the academic journal World Politics. 

 

ALUMNI

PREDOCTORAL FELLOWS

Chad Hazlett (2013-2014)
Assistant Professor
University of California - Los Angeles

Florian Hollenbach (2013-2014)
Postdoctoral Fellow
Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance, Princeton University
(Website)

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS
 
Brett Bensen (2010-2011)
Assistant Professor of Political Science and Asian Studies
Vanderbilt University
(Website)

Serra Boranbay (2009-2010)
Postdoctoral Research
University of Mannheim
(Website)

Hifeng Huang (2009-2010)
Assistant Professor of Political Science
University of California - Merced
(Website)

Carlo Prato (2012-2013)
Assistant Professor
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University
(Website)

Marc Ratkovic (2010-2012)
Assistant Professor
Department of Politics, Princeton University
(Website)

Yuki Takagi (2011-2012)
Postdoctoral Fellow
Stanford University

 

GRADUATE STUDENT FELLOWS

Avidit Acharya
Assistant Professor of Political Science and Economics
University of Rochester
(Website)

Graeme Blair 
Postdoctoral Fellow
Columbia University
(Website)

Peter Buisseret
Lecturer (tenure track), Department of Economics
University of Warwick
(Website)

Jidong Chen
Visiting Fellow
Wallis Institute of Political Economy, University of Rochester
(Website)

Stuart Jordan
Assistant Professor of Political Science
University of Rochester
(Website)

In Song Kim
Assistant Professor
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(Website)

Dustin Tingley
Assistant Professor of Government
Harvard University
(Website)

Teppei Yamamoto
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(Website)